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they are a government monopoly of almost always do a lousy job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apparent support. the first application had 70 letters the second was 125 letters. still deni
monopoly of almost always do a lousy job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apparent support. the first application had 70 letters the second was 125 letters. still denied. john:
, educational music and videos. everything they want. >> would you let your 5-year-old use this? >> if it's educational stuff. >> this is fun and education. amazon, walmart and target. >> for kids older and the entire family, we have the curio 7. this is a real android device. 4.0. for me, i can put anything on here, but i can also put profiles up here, up to eight. i can determine what sites my kids go to, what apps they go to and how long they stay on and control all of that right here. you will find this at best buy, toys "r" us and target.com. >> this is old school. >> the next level with that cardboard box. this is the discovery kids color and play steam engine. it's recycled cardboard, eco friendly. you'll find this at kohls in-store only. >> you guys are doing a great job. thanks for everything. >> coming up, we'll get that $12 bottle of wine. >> first, these messages. gecko (clearing throat) thank you, mr. speaker, uh, members of congress. in celebration of over 75 years of our government employees insurance company, or geico...as most of you know members it.congress. ...i propose
job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to rger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apppparent support. the first application had 70 letters the second was 125 letters still denied. john: six times. this is typical. >
can't. >> you can't, you shouldn't. >> right. >> when you start slashing education, when you start slashing r&d, transportation -- >> it's over. >> -- what you're doing is, you're slashing about 3%, 4% of the budget. and you're leaving the parts of the budget that blow a hole in the deficit and destroy this economy over the next 20 years. >> by the way, we won't go over the cliff for all the reasons we're talking about. even if we do, my friends on the street tell me, it's not a disaster. it's baked in. because we're going to get it done even after the fact. so you're talking about a few points in the market. >>> we're just moments away, joe and i will be removing -- >> oh, no! there it is! >> ow! >> it's all for a great cause. >> i don't know if it's that good. >> i don't know. is this going to be good television or kind of yucky? okay. we'll be right back. americans are always ready to work hard for a better future. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never takin
in the global race by switching from current spending to capital investment in science, roads and education. we offer new support for business and enterprise so they can create the jobs we need. and in everything we do we will show today we are on the side of those who want to work hard and get on. mr. speaker, the office for budget responsibility has today produced its latest economic forecast, and it is a measure of the constitutional achievement that it has taken for granted that our country's forecast is now produced independently of the treasury, free from the political interference of the past. i want to thank robert choate, his fellow members of the budget respondent committee and all their staff for their rigorous approach. one of the advantages of the creation of the abr is that not only do we get independent forecasts, we also get an independent explanation of why the forecasts are as they are. if, for example, lower rates was the result of of the government's fiscal policy, they would say so, but they do not. they say the economy has performed less strongly than expected -- >> [laugh
. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatey stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've go together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first applition was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the applicatn. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> y. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apparent support. the first application had 70 leers the second was 125 letters. still denied. john: six times. this is typical. >> it is more and more typical. all-purpe of the charter school movement was to create new public scols, held accountable but free from most rules and regulation. but government encroaches everyday on people who want to start schools. john: the blob in charge they don't that competition state education department even the best states we hav
, the left will find little things about texas. they'll say terrible in education. nobody's health care is covered. >> listen, if we were terrible -- >> and health care. >> -- but why would all the businesses copt to -- >> that's what they'll say. there's all the problems with texas. it's a horrible place. and nobody's covered by health insurance. the other knock is that i guess a lot of the business development is -- i don't know, what do they say, you've got these grants you give to private corporations. cronyism capitalism? >> we are competitive. >> they point to something and say what is it, federal, state grants to companies. >> it's called competition. >> is it crony capitalism? >> in the real world that's how you compete, you compete for those businesses. listen rick scott in florida is a competitor, bobby jindal, susan martinez, they are all competing for those businesses. if you want to sit there -- i'll give you a good example. i think the martin o'malley, former -- or still -- former dn -- >> he's in virginia now, right? >> no. i think he's up in maryland. >> yeah, yeah, yeah
education, published poems, journalism, and now this journalistic memoir. how do you -- you're now the most visible member of your generation of the family, of the generation before you, there's only one survivor, a woman not much involved in public life, how do you interpret your inherent? do you see yourself as a leader in some way? do you reflect on what your responsibilities are? how do you interpret your inherent? >> it's bad to think of it that way. it's that thinking that got us here in the first place. the idea that six letters of a last name somehow qualify anyone for leadership is dangerous and served pakistan dangerly, or, rather, it has not served pakistan so i never wanted, actually, for as long as i can remember, i wanted to be a writer, always. that -- or an actress or a swimmer. [laughter] my father was not pleased about the other two choices. i'm doing what i always thought i would be doing, what i always wanted to do, my heros growing up were always journalists, writers, and i think the notion of dynasty is one that has to be repudiated in my sense because we've seen what
? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely different, and it still is. more distance that makes them, for me, more fascinating than the french. >> we want to take questions from the audience, but i did just want to ask you a quick question about your work in movies because that has been so extraordinarily exceptional. i think probably a lot of people --
. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood. ♪ - hi, neighbour. we're playing at miss elaina's house today. she lives in the museum-go-round, and she is a very fun friend. verrry fun. - (robot voice): daniel tiger, i'
to the education budget. like the queues outside employment offices, protests are also becoming more common. >> the eurozone may be having problems, but german exports are surging. in the third quarter, they went up 3.6% over the same time last year. >> that is mainly because german companies have been selling more goods to countries outside the eurozone. >> times are tough for countries like spain and portugal. the economic downturn in southern europe meant that manufacturers saw their exports to some countries shrank more than 10% year-on-year, but growing demand from overseas more than balanced out the losses on the european market. the total value of exports within the european union dropped by just under 1%, but business was booming in the united states, up 26%. that rise outstripped even the increase seen from china. german cars especially remained popular overseas. i of german exports continue to sell at this rate, they could reach a record 1.1 billion euros for 2012. >> how did companies react to the export news, and what does that mean for investors? our correspondence sent us this
more spending on education and health care lessen spending on weapon systems. that's kind of the big picture. and whether it's nurture or nature, who cares. the idea is that women really need to be at the table and we need to be at the table in large enough numbers that the perspective that women do bring to the table will be heard and will have an impact. >> on the surface, it's hard to disagree with that. but in practice i'm wondering if it's that easy. obviously the idea is to get the best person possible and i'm wondering if it's realistic when you factor in who actually wants to be in public service, who can get confirmed, sort of who is in that pipeline. are there enough women even in the pipeline at this point? >> i don't think there's any question that there's enough women in the pipeline. you know, there are just so many women out there and we may not know their names, you and i. the public may not know their names but clearly women have been entering the pipeline since the 1970s. there are highly competent excellent public servants that are out there and whether they are kn
regularly played educational games with the boys in her nursery. and was actively involved in drop-offs and pickups at a day school in london. >> that was not okay with diana. >> reporter: in later years, william and harry would call diana, quite simply, the best mother in the world. those are some big maternal shoes to fill. but royal watchers predict kate is up to the challenge. >> i think william and kate's parenting styles may be similar to what diana did. and i think william and kate are going to follow that model, to do everything they can to ensure as normal a childhood as possible. but at the same time, educating their child for the future roles. >> i know it's a little early. but names are already being floated out there. and they may not surprise you. for a girl, we're hearing elizabeth. and for boys, charles or edward. and, yes. british bookies are in on the act. 6-1 odds that the royal baby is a redhead. josh? >> i'll take those odds. we'll be right back with you. >>> and ahead here, gold medalist gabrielle douglas here live. why she almost quit gymnastics just months b
. that is deviating away from what the real problems in education are. if you know that finland has the number one school system in the world and part of that process is making the standards so rigorous and they only the best of the best and same time they pay significantly more for teachers and once they earned that title. they earned complete autonomy over the class roommate. part of the problem we have so much regulation and mandates and we are dictated to how to teach in our classrooms. what is the point in making standards when we don't have the option to use professional judgment as it am is. >> steve: thank you very much for joining us on the wednesday morning from beautiful orlando, florida. thank you. >> thank you for having me. >> gretchen: we have a hypochrissy alert. remember michael moor's latest ovie bashing tax rate breaks. >> steve: and a big secret and writing a letter to his younger self as a warning for others not to do the same thing. coach k will reveal that letter with brian next on "fox and friends" ♪ ♪ than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, bu
into education, into science, into infrastructure as well and he'll be talking about the infrastructure initiatives including more must be for small to medium size businesses, more money for power stations as well. but it really looks like he's got very little room for maneuver. the opposition, he'll get that and say this is your fault, these are your policies. mr. osbourne will turn around and say look what's turning around you. look what's going on in the financial sector. look what's going on in the eurozone as well where unemployment is actually on the surface much worse than it is in the united kingdom. so it's going to be the usual ding dong battle of theatre. but i doubt we'll see many new initiatives that haven't been leaked already, ross. >> yeah, you only have to read the papers today and everything seems to be in there. i think you've done a very good two and a half-minute analysis of everything we might get. well-done. we'll come back to you later. get a cup of coffee, stay warm. julian joins us with his own thoughts. steve got into all the details. he's laid it all out for
at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. let's say you want to get ahead how do you get from here... to here? at university of phoenix we're moving career planning forward so you can start figuring that out sooner. ln fact, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. >>> let's return to syria now. months of civil war taking a terrible toll on families. especially those living along the frontlines. people who don't have enough money to get away. in a piece you'll only see on cnn, our arwa damon caught up with families who have just returned to the hard-hit city of aleppo. >> reporter: they are home again, but they are cold and broke and still in danger. about one-third of the families who fled the neighborhood of aleppo have come back only to find out that these streets are now on the frontlines. if the regime can retake, it can cut off the main artery for
's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> welcome back. our tough call this morning, there's no evidence coming to light in the trayvon martin investigation. there's a picture, new in-color picture of second-degree murder suspect george zimmerman, released by his attorney. it was reportedly taken by a police officer the night that zimmerman shot and killed trayvon martin. the picture itself is not new. the fact that it's a high resolution color photo is. we've seen black and white versions. to what degree does this help george zimmerman's case? does it change the case? >> obviously we're not in the legal process, so we don't know all the details. but i don't think it really tells you that much. it doesn't tell you at what point any injuries were sustained and what was going on when they were. clearly there was an altercation, which we always knew that. >> i'm a nonpracticing lawyer. >> you always do the denials first. i just want to say, this is not my client. then you launch into -- but if you see a guy's b
to the problem is for americans to become educated on how to cut spending. how you eliminate the tax deductions and expand the tax base so that you can increase the revenue without punishing segment of society. that doesn't it in the simp sob cartoon. they couldn't articulate that in a comical way. we are run by liberals who never spent a dollar they couldn't spend twice. obama could be a great foreign policy president if he pretended the enemies are rich americans. >> bob: you don't think there is waste in defense? >> greg: absolutely. i do think there is a waste of defense. >> dana: the waste in defense, climate change programs that they have to do. >> eric: greg pointed out things that are important. listen to the genius, howard dean. >> the only problem, truth is everybody needs to pay more taxes, not just the rich. >> that is not harasssy, that is honesty. honest moment for the first time. >> bob: can you tell us 30 seconds to tell us how to get the deficit down? >> greg: stop spending. >> bob: i get that. >> eric: i don't need 30 seconds. go over the fiscal cliff. take $1.2 trillion out
anything into that or is that -- >> again i will liken it to there are plenty of people far more educated on this than i but from a negotiation standpoint i think again it is a lot about posturing. sending out your feelers. melissa: right. >> and seeing what the other side's response is to that and kind of figuring out what's the quasi-middle kbround. melissa: yeah. >> that is what the president is doing here, saying this isn't in the spirit what we're trying to accomplish. melissa: right. >> but for the president from what i can see, getting this behind him and getting this settled starts the next term of his presidency. melissa: so if you were advising him what would you tell him to do next in order to win this? how many days would you want him to wait? how tough would you want him to come back with a counter proposal or no counter proposal at all from pure negotiating? >> the interesting part, i think this does play in business --. melissa: oh, sure. >> we're in the midst of the holiday season. i don't know when congress shuts down for the year but that's coming. melissa: right. they h
of it is of their own making. you cannot start with the education of the kids, teaching them to aid israel and everything it stands for and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. so there are a lot of conditions . it can't happen overnight. so does the central part of the problem is they created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of reasonable deal. >> expressed some pessimism or realism about what is likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops. there will be back, a senseless, to where it was before september 11th. what happens in pakistan after that? democratic, emphasis on semi. >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as you apply them there will be circumstances for some nuance and potential compromise has required, then you approached all of these problems the way. you have very good intelligence. you can understand what is going on with in
a big difference. so our people are looking at it, we're helping them, we're educating them, but i think decisions are going to be held on how we're going to handle it until after all the rules have been released. >> it would make a big difference because you have so many seasonal workers for 90 days versus the year? >> yeah, just overall cost. as you look at the turnover and all the rest of it, it's going to make some difference to us. there's a 30-hour limit, but there's been some discussion as to whether or not that could be 35. 35 would clearly be better. so i mean, there's just a lot of these rules that are yet to be written and i think they're going to have a big impact on how people are going to approach it. >> so, patrick, let me try to take this from a difference direction from a democratic perspective. i'm not trying to be difficult. but there are two ways to look at the mandate that goes with the employees. one s a burden on business. the other is it's an opportunity for business to attract and keep employees, particularly in seasonal jobs that are difficult to fill. is there
disgracefully. he had an expensive oxford education but purposefully denied it to young winston. >> purposefully, for what reason. >> partly money. he was very conscious of the expense of sending winston to oxford. he suggested that the army was a more suitable career and then tried to bargain with him not to go to the cavalry, that might be too expensive there. that wasn't all together an easy relationship. >> but he sold to to winston churchill by saying you can be a great man of the army. >> he did. he tried to. >> he later discovered that he really was too stupid to go to the bar. he was very disappointed, that he thought his father thought he was, you know, was going to be successing -- --. >> rose: found out his father thought he was too stupid. >> his father was dismissive. >> horrid to him. >> winston always wanted his father's affection. even a poignant story late in his life after the second world war where he had had all these accomplishments where winston has this supposedly dream moment where his father comes back and winston starts to tell him all the things he, winston has done. a
, he is -- he's a real leader. he's really smart. he's very well educated, has a graduate degree. he was raised all over the world because his parents were both in the military, both of them. and he has these core values. he was elected captain by his teammates as a rookie quarterback early on because he's signified this. i mean, this is a guy who helped put six points on the board after fumbling, a rare fumble, if you saw that play on monday night. >> yeah. >> sort of a weird play. we were all screaming, you know, that was a fumble! because obviously, if it hadn't been, it wouldn't have been six points. mike, he is really a very special character. this is not just spin. >> sam stein, i realize you went to school in the woods up there in dartmouth, but the idea of living in a metropolitan area, washington, d.c., where nearly everyone is obsessed with a single individual, the quarterback of the washington redskins, is incredible. >> andrea says this is not spin, but she's literally spinning. it's unbelievable, she's so happy with this guy. he fumbles correctly, this man walks on water
research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> welcome back. it's a performance enhancing trick called window dressing used by managers to boost their yearly returns. joining us to protect your money and the risk, understanding the risk better, is ronn ensana. good to see you. what exactly is window dressing? let's get right to the source of this issue. we see it every year. explain it. >> if depends. we've been doing this for 28 years together. when we first started talking about it, it was a way for a portfolio manager not to look dumb. this is what they're talking about in "the wall street journal" today. th
schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. sponsored report gave a full endorsement that more liquid natural gas exports will help our economy and more shale oil and gas production will make us energy independent. question, will the epa keep its snout out of this great breakthrough energy process? here now to tell us is john hoffmeister. john, what's this take on the liquefied natural gas? i didn't even know there were constraints on their exports. >> well, the department of energy has to grant permits to economies that would seek to export natural gas. the study that came out was not an endorsement by the department energy, not yet. it was a third-party report analyzing the situation. it will now go into public discussion. the department of energy hasn't really taken a position yet opt report. but here's the reality. this is buried treasure, larry, this is buried treasure in this country, natural gas, i mean, that could be the stimulus that this economy has been loo
and riding in particular but educated people and become more discriminating, become more effective judges of what makes something good. people buy books, this is a book loving community and the institute has done all loss and enhanced that. on some level create the environment in which people can explore literature especially. there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite ridge. we are any feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation as the writers institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers, in columbia county where a lot of new york city writers have weekend homes all the way up to saratoga and beyond, the writers colony -- the writers' groups in hudson, n.y. east and west into western massachusetts, west to syracuse. that is the audience, sort of circumference we work with so when you go back and you find a general population quite proud of albany's connection to henry james and herman melville or bret harte or a little bit further eas
missiles. >> they were in israel. >> they were in israel. >> go back to your education, then. where did you go to college? >> i did a b.a./m.a. of middle eastern history at columbia college. an m.a. and b.a.in middle eastern at princeton. >> israeli and american citizen? >> i am. >> why due end up in the 1982 war in lebanon? >> i always wanted to move to israel. i saw my future in israel. i wanted to raise my family in israel. in 1973, at the end of the 1973 war which i would have missed had i been living in israel, i determined i wasn't going to move just then. i was going to do my b.a. first. i did my b.a. which turned out as an m.a. i worked as an advisor to the israeli administration to the u.n. arafat speaking for the general assembly. very tumultuous period. i moved to israel and tried for this unit in the army. the tryouts are rather rigorous. i did 17 months of basic training. and got out just prior to the lebanon war. but in israel, we have -- you serve for a long period your regular serve and do reserve service to the age of 52. now i have a son in the army who is 19. and in a ver
people, but the education to stop producing them. >> that's sad. how do we get that back? >> well, it's a concerted effort to get them back. and with this project i've talked about where we will do a mac in the united states next year, i think this is -- this is a really good step for us. and the consumer electronics world was really never here. it's not a matter of bringing it back, it's a matter of starting it here. >> good morning, thanks for joining us here. >> while steve jobs liked to avoid the spotlight, he also thrived on it. as if he was selling products that were pieces of his own soul. he was inventor, pitch man, and new wave pied piper all in one. tim cook is just a different guy. while he believes in the almighty product just as much. >> how are you not steve jobs? >> in many ways, one of the things he did for me that removed a gigantic burden that would've normally existed is he told me on a couple of occasions before he passed away to never question what he would've done. never ask the question what he would do, to just do what's right. >> brian williams' conversation w
will not take our future. ♪ our weapons are testing... education, care and support. ♪ and aids... ♪ aids is going to lose. aids is going to lose. ♪ for a medicare plan? you only have 5 days left. open enrollment ends friday, december 7th. so give unitedhealthcare a call today. consider a medicare advantage plan. it can combine doctor and hospital coverage with prescription drug coverage for as low as a zero dollar monthly premium. you only have until december 7th to enroll. call unitedhealthcare today. it happened this week. a new look for an old-time childhood standby. the tops company announced it's giving a makeover to its flagship product bazooka bubble gum. launched in 1947, since 195 every piece has featured a small folded up comic strip with an eye-patch wearing boy and his turtle-neck-challenged best friend. not the most sophisticated humor we'll admit but perfect for the bubble-gum set not just here but around the world. but now we learn no more. the updated bazooka, due in stores next month, will feature a slightly larger piece of gum, a brand new additional flavor, blue-rasp
people to excellent artwork and writing in particular, but we've educated people to become more discriminating, to become more effective judges of what makes something good. and people read. people buy books. this is a very book-loving commitment, and i think the writer's institute has done a lot to, um, enhance that. even on some level create the environment in which people can explore literature especially. i think that there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite, quite rich, and we're in a kind of feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation as the writer's institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers writers -- find sort of an arc down from columbia county where a lot of new york city writers have weekend homes all the way up to saratoga and beyond. we have places like the writer's colony, writers' groups in hudson, new york, east and west into western massachusetts and west to syracuse. that's the audience sort of circumfe
teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? for over 60,000 california foster children, the holidays can be an especially difficult time. everything's different now. sometimes i feel all alone. christmas used to be my favorite. i just don't expect anything. what if santa can't find me? to help, sleep train is holding a secret santa toy drive. bring your gift to any sleep train, and help keep the spirit of the holidays alive. not everyone can be a foster parent, but anyone can help a foster child. ♪ candle is burning low ♪ lots of mistletoe ♪ lots of snow and ic
, experts say iranians are very technologycal and most are young and educated and will quickly find ways around the government block. >>> the nation's largest antidrug group done teaching kids about pot. dare america will no longer include marijuana in its curriculum forfeit and sixth graders. the reason why? a statement on the nonprofit's web site says, quote, talking to kids about marijuana does not deter them from trying marijuana and may actually foster an interest in using the substance. those are your headlines. how do they know that? >> steve: a different kind of dare. laura ingraham is joining us today from our nation's capitol. good morning to you. >> sorry about that giants game last night. >> steve: that's okay. >> we're beaming in washington. sorry. >> brian: we, unfortunately, didn't tape the game. we don't know how it ended. >> steve: i think you could tell by the look on her face. >> brian: i know it was 16-10 when i went to bed. >> i saw it. washington might be paralyzed about this ridiculous fiscal cliff, but we're happy about this. >> gretchen: the only good news for wa
currency trading on fridays 5:30 eastern and if you want more education about currencies, go to currency class@money motion.cnbc.com. >>> a bigger than expected slide in the past week down by 2.4 million barrels. crude supplies fell by 2.4 million barrels. 7.9 million barrels was the rise in gasoline inventories. then we are also looking at fuel supplies that were up by 3 million barrels. up by 3 million barrels. we are looking right now at a sell-off in the oil market. we're still holding above the $88 mark for wti crude futures. we're also looking at lower prices for gasoline because of that huge build we saw and higher prices for heating oil. a proxy for diesel fuel and reflecting the distillate fuel supply number. bigger builds than were anticipated for gasoline and a bigger decline than was expected for crude supplies. send it back to you. >> thank you so much. when we come back, deal making in a post-fiscal cliff world. faber has an exclusive interview with the ceo of investment bank moelis and company. more in just a moment. >> announcer: the holiday season is here and that means
, early childhood education 12-1 on the return. you can't get that on the stock market. >> stephanie: representative you guys stay strong and keep fighting because i gotta say you know, you look at any poll and people are with us on these issues, you know. you can look at -- >> i agree. >> stephanie: tax cuts proveably caused these deficits. the social security does not -- doesn't add a cent to the deficit. >> i ran on this in a conservative district very clearly stated my position that i did not want to. i had to last time when the president asked us to, to extend all of the taxes for one year and that was a darn bitter pill for me to swallow. i was one of the democrats that voted on to get it through. i'm not going to do it again. it doesn't add to the economy and those top 2 don't need to get done. we all do agree on the bottom ones and i just -- i think now they've got themselves in a pretty tight box. i hope you keep beating the drum on this. >> stephanie: i think you're a helper. you're giving
in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. >>> it is interesting to zero how -- the guidance is below street consensus and looks immediately through it because they think you are sandbagging that guidance. so walk us through the deceleration in same store sales growth. why are you giving this forecast? is it capacity issues? what is behind the slowdown? >> i don't think it's really capacity issues for us at all. i think we have great product in the store right now. we definitely lost some momentum in the middle, or the beginning of the quarter in november. where we had some technical issues with our product notifications, which we send out to guests, so we weren't driving traffic to our stores
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